TaylorMade M6 Driver Review

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TaylorMade M6 Driver Review

The TaylorMade M6 driver stands out from the crowd with some first-rate game improvement technology. In particular, we are talking about an aerodynamic carbon sole with so-called inertia generator, along with a speed injected twist face. These two features combine to deliver maximum ball speed and incredible levels of forgiveness. TaylorMade claim that the speed injected twist face technology on offer here results in a driver face that is incredibly precise, with every one of the M6 drivers in the line-up scraping the edge of the coefficient of restitution (COR) limit. Need more convincing? Read on for in-depth review on what to expect from the TaylorMade M6.

Introducing the M6

One of the big draws about the M5 driver from TaylorMade was its levels of adjustment. In fact, the TaylorMade M5 was one of the best options on the market for this. With the M6, TaylorMade have dialled things down a notch, opting for a more simple and accessible driver. The TaylorMade M6 dispenses with the moveable weights found with the M5, resulting in a driver that is more consistent in its approach and more forgiving in its performance. This stripped-back design should definitely appeal to purists and more confident golfers. Even the less experienced golfer will find the robust nature and readiness of the M6 an attractive option.

Aesthetics

If you are familiar with the M5 driver from TaylorMade, you will instantly notice that the M6 shares may physical characteristics with its predecessor. In fact, the two drivers are difficult to distinguish from each other at first inspection. Both the M5 and M6 share a matte black carbon fibre that is particularly noticeable when you are in the address position. However, once you delve a little deeper, the differences between the two begin to present themselves. With the M6, you will notice a slim silver ribbon along the leading edge. Behind this is a TaylorMade alignment aid to help you achieve better results from your shots. The M6 also includes a slimline red graphic along the back edge of the club head. This leads into a striking M6 logo at the heel section of the driver.

More distinct differences can be found on the other side of the club head. With the M5, this is where you would have found the moveable weights to allow for fine-tuned adjustments. The M6 does not have these, instead boasting a solid sole. This sole section is dominated by carbon fibre.

Feel & Acoustics

Many golfers who have played with the M5 will have enjoyed the solid feel and superior sound feedback of that driver. The TaylorMade M6 builds upon these strengths. The sound of the M6 is very similar in character to the M5. It is a low-pitched sound with a metallic quality. However, the M6 is somewhat louder than the M5. This should appeal to less confident golfers who need more pronounced audible feedback upon impact, although players of all proficiencies will welcome this sound enhancement.

When it comes to physical feedback, the TaylorMade M6 might fall short of your expectations. Compared to other clubs on the market, the M6 is actually subpar in this respect. The driver is promoted as a forgiving, more stable choice of club. However, the manufacturer may have been a little heavy-handed in its approach here. The club is so firm in feel that you will struggle to get useful feedback on mishits. You will only really notice significant differences in feedback should you make contact at the heel or toe, but neither situation is particularly useful.

In Practice

As with the M5, TaylorMade’s M6 utilises some impressive game improvement technologies. In particular, we are talking about the Speed Injected Twist Face and HammerHead 2.0. What sets the M5 apart from the M6 is how it substitutes for the lack of moveable weights. In lieu of these moveable weights, the M6 includes an inertia generator that comes in at about 46 grams. This inertia generator is strategically positioned low in the rear of the head. This results in a driver with high levels of forgiveness. Although we have talked about the drawbacks of this, the high levels of forgiveness on offer here result in consistently high ball speeds that should help your game.

The HammerHead 2.0 sole slot is a particularly welcome addition to the M6. It is relatively flexible in nature, expanding the sweet spot of the driver head. This allows you to enjoy better ball speeds more consistently, even on off-centre hits. If you struggle with your swing and sometimes fail to achieve centred impact with the ball, this sole slot will become your best friend on the golf course.

When it comes to launch conditions and spin levels, the M6 falls somewhere in the middle when held up against comparable drivers on the market. This is by no means a problem and is actually quite desirable for golfers looking for a reliable driver that will deliver consistent ball flight. You can of course push the limits of spin and launch by fitting your driver with a specialist shaft, although the differences will be slight.

Another potential drawback of the TaylorMade M6 is that is a draw biased choice of driver. This is down to the alignment aid found on the club head. The alignment guide is placed relatively close to the heel. This makes the club easier to hit left than it is to hit right. That being said, it is not particularly difficult to compensate for this and adjust your play to achieve optimal ball flight.

Verdict

The TaylorMade M6 is a versatile choice of driver that performs consistently on the driving range and golf course. Fans of its predecessor, the M5, will want to take some time to consider the spec on offer here before they invest, however. The elimination of the moveable weights of the M5 is a marked design departure. Even with the substitute technologies utilised by the M6, launch and spin is somewhat difficult to get a handle on. That being said, the M6 does stand out when it comes to forgiveness. Ultimately, the TaylorMade M6 is a robust and relatively reliable all-rounder that should put in good stead on the course or range.

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